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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll look at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. i'm phil torres, i study insects in peru. that's our team. let's do some science. ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over three-quarters of a million to settle a lawsuit. what was it about. >> there's a focus on the concussion problem. the nfl has thousands of place, and millions of players in youth and challenge football. i went to virginia tech to look at technology to test helmets and track hits on college and youth players. let's take a look. . >>> homecoming in the heartland. this is cornhusker county. nebraska university, the epicentre of college football. >> first big win. >> along with the tradition of football - come the hits.
science by scientists. let's check out our team of hardcore nerds. lindsey miran is a cia operative and analyst. tonight, high tech crime stoppers. shots fired in the night. cops pinpoint the crime scene. how do they do it? the new science of solving crime. crystal dilworth is a scientist. if you think wine making is old school, think good. the newest ways of making wine. >> a neuro scientist and i will phil tores, an entimologist. the by onic arm. see how it's more man-like than machine. that's our team. now, let's do some science. >> hey, guys, welcome to techknow where we bring you stories of innovation here in america. i am phil torres. i am here with michelle, crystal and lindsey. you went to one of the most violent cities in america to see how technology can help us fight crime? >> that's right. i went to oakland, california which has the 5th highest crime rate and nearby richmond which is among the top 20 to look at some very innovative technology that they are looking to increase the eyes and ears of the police force on the street. so let's have a look these are streets. >>
and academy outcomes. the center for science interest regards the lead lobbyist force for healthy food spent $70,000. $47 million versus $70,000. what are the lobbying efforts on behalf of our children's meals. >> i would like to talk about what happens at the government level when the meal pattern is developed, the food pyramid and those kinds of things are established. but what i can talk to you about is what happens in the school cafeteria. we have made significant changes. i've been a school food service director for over 20 years and i've seen the changes that has happened to our food programs. theres "s" nothinthere is nothid but that we've made great strides. food lobbyists are going to be here. they're going stay around. they are in it to make money. that's the reality. we, however, don't want that to happen on the backs of our children, and we're very concerned that the food that we serve our children is healthy. >> michelle, pick up on that. the booe food and beverage industry doubled. what kind of influence do you get. >> you have pizza as a vegetable. let's look at what happens w
. this is a show about science by this is a show about science by scin histories. scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge combat and cutting edge technology that can help to technology that can help to detect a concussion before detect a concussion before it's it's too late. too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. operative. she was packaging that can one she was packaging that can one day replace day replace
. >> joining me from cambridge, massachusetts, a professor of planet tear science at m.i.t. and just this wednesday she testified before congress. it is great to speak with yo you{^l" ^}. for those who haven't had the benefit of watching your tech talk, will you tell me about your work, and everyone is watching about your work in planetary exploration. >> sure, tony, it's great to be here. to summarize it in a nutshell we want to know if there are other planets like earth out there. ranging from computer programming, and hubble telescope to planning separati e exploration. >> is there an earth twin out there? >> we don't have enough evidence to say anywhere near for sure there is an earth twin. but our data so far shows that small planets are common. they are everywhere we look. we do find small planets. >> what are bio signatures? and what do they tell us? >> well, bio signature gasses haven't yet been found on another planet beyond earth but they are gasses in an atmosphere that are produced by life. oxygen, what we need to survive, is here in huge quantities. without life on earth
it comes to math around science. they released data from the international students assessment every three years teens take the test. tonight we have how the united states faired. more than half a million 15 and 16-year-old's tested their skills on the 2012 program for international student assessment. the survey doesn't measure whether students know their facts. it tests whether teens are able to apply the reading, math and science skills to scenarios in the rile world. the tests say the united states is average when it comes too reading and sciential an sciencw average when it comes to math. they scored 481 in math and shanghai china scored of 18. 618 the sha shanghai students are ahead of u.s. students by two years. we have a loc a long way to go. the only way to improve is to invest is a in education. and these things coupled together are going to move us in the right direction. >> most participating countries improved their performage perfoe united states fell flat. it's confusing to 19-year-old jenny jung. >> i don't get how like the americans can score solo in a national test. >> th
of the influence, and sought another explanation, that is to say a chemical polonium. to sum up, i trust science. when all the experts that they agree. my lawyer will request that the swiss expertise be handed over to the feoffment expertise, thank you. french experts. if you have any questions my lawyers -- it's very complicated. why is there so much difference. because it is so complicated. would you like us to express ourselves in english to sum it up or -- >> all right, so that was the press conference being held. she is the widow of the palestinian president yasir arafat, as well as her lawyer responding to a terrific report into the death of arafat which says that he wasn't poisons he died of a hemorrhage in his brine. basically saying that she is upset by the contradiction between the two reports and she will be asking the swiss experts, and the swiss expertise to be handed over to the french so that's just the gist of what yasir arafat was saying. let's cross to our european news center, and lauren taylor for that. >> says he is ready to negotiate, but he wants an end to the blockade of
for courts to overturn convictions based on science that is later debunked so on november 18th the san antonio four reunited and meeting the granddaughter for the first time and ready to makeup for lost time. >> it was a death in the family and births. marriages and just so many things over the years that we have missed. >> reporter: the road aheld won't be easy, the women have been released but not exonerated and there is that to fight, jobs to find and lives to rebuild. the four say as long as they stick together they will do all that and more. heidi docastra al jazeera san antonio. >> more than 2000 people who were wrongfully convicted have been exonerated in the past two decades and spent an average of ten years in prison and 30% of them have been exonerated by dna evidence. the president obama and first ladder were there and billy joel and santana and oprah singer, jazz musician herbie joncock and these are performers who influenced culture through the arts. and the flash mob military style, the u.s. airforce ban surprised visitors at the washington and space museum and it starte
places, less generally. there's no science to it. one of the things that was irresponsibly sold was the idea that a certain idea of stops and frisks would make the city safer. if you double it the city would be twice as safe. it was bizarre and shouldn't have been put out there. >> you mentioned the counterterrorism. some argue it's very successful since there's not been a major terrorist attack. what is it that needs to happen in that unit. i think it needs to scale back the activities. the unit targeted the communities, not based on a suspicion of wrongdoing. people were muslim. they went to the mosque, they went to a halal butcher shop. these are the things used to target communities. we need to go back it a place where people civil people when there was a reason to do so. they don't go around collecting everything from the halal food restaurants. >> be more focused on it. ooep if it leads to know terrorist attack. >> you are assuming there's a causation between the wide net. >> last year the uniform chief of the intelligence division said that they had not had a single in th
will do more of it in some places, a lot less of it generally but there is no science to it. one things that got irresponsibly sold is that a certain amount of stops and frifshingz would make the city safer and if you doubled that, the city would somehow be twice as safe. that was bizarre and should never have been put out there. >> you mentioned the counter terrorism formed after september 11th. some arguments, it's very successful especially since there has not been a major terror attack in new york city since then. what needs to happen with that unit? >> that unit needs to significantly scale back its activities. the unit has targeted entire communities, not based upon any suspicion of wrongdoing but simply because people were muslim, because they went to the mosque, because they prayed >> because they went to a halal butcher shop. these are the kind of things that have been used to target entire communities. we need to go back to a place where the police surveilled people when they had a reason to do so and don't just go around klegging those who go to the halal restaurants. >> if h
that his death was caused by polonium-210. french science tests found polonium found in the natural origin and did not cause the death. his widow reacts to conflicting reports. >> you can imagine to what extent i'm upset by these contradictions regarding the best european experts on the matt. what should one think. >> reporter: an document first reported that swiss scientists found high levels of polonium in blood and urine samples. arafat's widow, a french citizen, asked for a an inquiry eight years after his death. 60 tissue samples were collected and distributed to france, switzerland and russia. swiss scientists concluded that he was poisoned. >> they are characteristic of him having a dose of polonium just before he died. so those levels are about 36 times what you would expect in a normal person. >> reporter: according to palestinian officials russian scientists reported the amount of polonium in arafat's samples were inconclusive. france reports it could have come from naturally occurring gasses surrounding the too many. >> french officials say they'll continue their investigation.
. >> joining us now is a professor of political science and the author of a book about the venezuelan revolution. >> is embracing chavez's technique a way to go? >> in some cases it is essential. it's clear that nicolas maduro knows that he is not chavez, and cannot be chavez and had to prove himself in different ways. >> is it working for him. is he gaining popularity in venezuela. >> they were on the ropes over summer due to a political economic offensive by the opposition. what we are seeing from the poll strs is recent weeks have seen a serve for the chavista character. it is seen that nicolas maduro has now taken a strong line, particularly for those charging more for goods and is now starting to be seep as someone it can lead the revolution. >> what do you think will be the >> a few months back it looked good for the opposition. what we are probably looking at now is a narrow victory for the chavista. a couple of mayoral races will be the telling sign. if you she the chaffistas coming away with those elections, it will be good for them. >> when you think about how much the count
for computer skype tists and a leap for explorers and researchers. >>. >> i know it's meant for science, but it looks like it will be great to watch tv on. >> michael eaves will run down the big game. >> hundreds gather to mark a 33rd anniversary of nelson mandela's death. more when we return. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. an act of terror then a rush to justice for pan am flight 103. >> the eyes of the world will be on us. >> an investigation under scrutiny. >> it looks nothing like him. somebody's telling lies. >> this was a miscarriage of justice. >> did they get the wrong man? >> there's something else going on. >> a shocking documentary event begins with: the pan am bomber on al jazeera america presents. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with a quick look at the top stories. >> people across south africa and the world are honouring the legacy of nelson mandela. religious services are hold across the globe to remember one of the greatest leaders of our time. increasing tensions in asia
years ago, but he works in his time, not ours. we're free. >> the so-called junk science that put the kellers in prison for 21 years is the target of a test of law allowing convictions to be challenged. the law has been in effect for three months in a state where wrongful convictions are the most numerous in the country. >> in san antonio three women won their freedom in late november. these women were imprisoned for 16 years. the four women were convicted of satanic ritual abuse of two children, one who later recanted her story. just as in mc-keller's case a medical expert admitted to erownous forensic testing. >> i felt like everything we claimed did not happen. and for her to basically say that, you know, there was no - that there is no evidence or it was faulty i kind of felt like - how come nobody listened. >> while the women and mc-keller have been freed, they have not been exonerated. for that another legal battle laws's limits. >> that was heidi jo-castro in austin texas. >> and it will be a difficult road ahead for the u.s. men's soccer team and jith john henry smith is h
the first science monday evening. nothing was decided. the anti-government leader aim out of that saying they were no better off, there was no negotiation, it was a meet and greet situation. there have been reports that perhaps there are more mings taking place between those respective leaders. >> the dust is settling after a wild weekend of football. mark morgan is here to tell us about it. >> are you a college football fan? >>meh. >> i didn't expect a meh. here's the deal with number one alabama falling to auburn that in amazing finish saturday, the b.c.s. standards have shifted, boasting a new number one and number what. florida state moves into the top spot. the seminoles throttled florida over the weekend. ohio state is now second. the buckeyes squeaked by rainfall michigan, needing to stop a two-point conversion to hold on for the win. auburn to win over alabama had the tigers in third. missouri is now number five. >> 100 yards for the touchdown against alabama mauve set the stage for much discussion about which teams should be in the national title game. now auburn faces missouri
classroom, according to test results focussing on maths, english and science. singapore, taiwan and south korea are at the top of the list. the american results were called a picture of stagnation. the test was given to 50-year-olds in 55 countries. a man was trapped for three days under water after his boat capsized off the coast of name earia. it was an accident that took the lives of many people. >> this was the mission to recover bodies from a boat. suddenly a rescue diver finds this. >> harrison survived for three days in a pocket of air, drinking water and fizzy drinks. is 11 of the crew died when it capsized and sank. >> a diver pulls harrison from the sunken boat. >> harrison is now safe and with a story of remarkable survival to tell. . >> it's amazing. he survived off one bottle of soda. >> anunderwater discovery of a different sore. this 400 foot mega-subways found off the sea floor of hawaii. it dates back to world war ii. it was one of five that met a similar fate. >>> in australia a birt took a camera on the flight of its life. he took off on a 70 mile journey. the bird's fl
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)